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(en) Britain, The Solidarity Federation's book, Fighting for ourselves: anarcho-syndicalism and the class struggle - Endnotes VI (6/6)

Date Mon, 17 Dec 2012 18:40:26 +0200


IWA statutes, see: www.iwa-ait.org/?q=statutes ---- Quoted in Abel Paz, Durruti – the people armed. ---- Unit 24 of SelfEd – SolFed’s self-education course on anarcho-syndicalism. See: www.selfed.org.uk ---- John Quail, The slow burning fuse, p. 246-247.
John Turner was one of the publishers of the agitational syndicalist paper ‘The voice of labour’ which advocated direct action and the general strike. However, his position as a bureaucrat undermined in practice the politics he espoused in theory. ---- See this blog by an anarcho-syndicalist in the PCS trade union: www.libcom.org/blog/trade-union-factionalism-rank-file-organising-11022012 ---- This is not to say a shop steward position cannot sometimes be used to further a direct action based organising strategy, e.g. by using a union recognition agreement as legal cover to hold workplace meetings which organise unofficial, on the job action.

Tom Brown, Principles of syndicalism: www.libcom.org/library/principles-of-syndicalism-tom-brown
The CWU union called off planned Christmas strikes – the most powerful weapon in the postal workers’ arsenal – for ‘meaningful negotiations’ prompted by unspecified concessions. The talks, of course, had to be kept secret from the membership. Three months of silence and demobilisation later, and the CWU recommended acceptance of an almost identical deal involving 40,000 job losses. The ‘victory’ was that the CWU would be ‘consulted’ on these cuts. Demoralised by three months of silence and having squandered building momentum in the pre-Christmas strikes, posties voted to accept the deal, though it was widely seen as a ‘sell out’.
Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The communist manifesto: http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist-manifesto/ch02...
Vladimir Illych Lenin, What is to be done?: http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1901/witbd/ii.htm
Leon Trotsky, The history of the Russian revolution: www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/1930/hrr/ch00.htm
Amadeo Bordiga, Theses on the role of the Communist Party in the proletarian revolution: www.libcom.org/library/role_party_bordiga
Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The German ideology: www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1845/german-ideology/ch01a.htm#a4 (the quoted passage appears as an added note in margin of the original manuscript).
Vladimir Illych Lenin, State and revolution: www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1917/staterev/ch01.htm#s4
Leon Trotsky, The history of the Russian revolution: www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/1930/hrr/ch01.htm
For a good introductory account, see Ida Mett, The Kronstadt uprising of 1921: www.libcom.org/library/the-kronstadt-uprising-ida-mett
See Maurice Brinton, The Bolsheviks and workers’ control – state and counter-revolution: www.libcom.org/library/the-bolsheviks-and-workers-control-solidarity-group
Rudolf Rocker, Anarcho-syndicalism: www.libcom.org/library/anarcho-syndicalism-rudolf-rocker-chapter-3
Quoted in Bob Holton, British syndicalism 1900-1914, myths and realities, p.36.
Subversion, Labouring in vain - a critical history of the Labour Party: http://libcom.org/library/labouring-vain
To what extent it did so will be taken up in chapter 4; successful post-war wage struggles ultimately shifted the costs on to the bosses, which is part of why they came to hate the welfare state.
See 1978-1979: Winter of Discontent: www.libcom.org/history/1978-1979-winter-of-discontent
Syndicalist Workers Federation, How Labour governed 1945-51: http://libcom.org/history/how-labour-governed-1945-1951
Efforts are often made to find ‘anarchism’ in figures as diverse as the 6th century BC Chinese mystic Lao-Tse, ultra-individualist Ayn Rand, and even leaders of states such as Reagan and Thatcher. Peter Marshall’s liberal history of anarchism, ‘Demanding the impossible’, is amongst the worst offenders here as a consequence of stripping away the socialist opposition to private property, like a good liberal, and reducing anarchism to mere ‘anti-state’ sentiment, so vague even heads of state can share it. There certainly are libertarian and anti-state ideas and movements throughout history, but labelling these ‘anarchist’ is anachronistic.
Peter Kropotkin, Mutual aid: a factor of evolution: www.libcom.org/library/mutual-aid-peter-kropotkin
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th Century: www.libcom.org/library/anarcho-syndicalism-20th-century-vadim-damier
Quoted in Maurizio Antonioli (ed), The International Anarchist Congress of Amsterdam (1907), p.113.
Quoted in Maurizio Antonioli (ed), The International Anarchist Congress of Amsterdam (1907), p.123. Malatesta's analysis is astute in that workers' economic positions alone cannot be assumed sufficient to create unity in struggle, let alone libertarian communism. Simply recruiting all the workers into one organisation doesn't dissolve the hierarchies and ideological conflicts among them, nor necessarily make for common struggle.
The following quotes and paraphrased argument is drawn from Errico Malatesta’s 1925 Syndicalism and anarchism: http://www.marxists.org/archive/malatesta/1925/04/syndic1.htm
Dielo Truda, The organisational platform of the libertarian communists, part 3: http://libcom.org/library/platform-3
Dielo Truda, The organisational platform of the libertarian communists, part 3: http://libcom.org/library/platform-3
Dielo Truda, The organisational platform of the libertarian communists, part 5: http://libcom.org/library/platform-5
Rudolf Rocker, Anarcho-syndicalism: http://libcom.org/library/anarcho-syndicalism-rudolf-rocker-chapter-6
Fernand Pelloutier, History of the bourses du travail: http://libcom.org/library/chapter-six-activities-bourses-du-travail
Paul Mason, Live working or die fighting, p.124.
Rudolf Rocker, Anarcho-syndicalism: http://libcom.org/library/anarcho-syndicalism-rudolf-rocker-chapter-6
CGT, The charter of Amiens: http://www.marxists.org/history/france/cgt/charter-amiens.htm
Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe, The rise and fall of revolutionary syndicalism, in Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe (eds) Revolutionary syndicalism, p.3.
Stewart Bird, Dan Georgakas, and Deborah Shaffer (eds), Solidarity forever: an oral history of the IWW, p.3.
Quoted in Patrick Renshaw, The Wobblies: the story of the IWW and syndicalism in the United States, p.46.
Patrick Renshaw, The Wobblies: the story of the IWW and syndicalism in the United States, p.47.
IWW, Preamble to the IWW cconstitution: http://www.iww.org/en/culture/official/preamble.shtml
Stewart Bird, Dan Georgakas, and Deborah Shaffer (eds), Solidarity forever: an oral history of the IWW, p.5.
Many of the anarchists described this as ‘anti-political’, equating politics with party politics and the state. We use the term in a more everyday sense, that someone who is an anarchist has political beliefs.
Stewart Bird, Dan Georgakas, and Deborah Shaffer (eds), Solidarity forever: an oral history of the IWW, p.9.
Stewart Bird, Dan Georgakas, and Deborah Shaffer (eds), Solidarity forever: an oral history of the IWW, p.8.
Stewart Bird, Dan Georgakas, and Deborah Shaffer (eds), Solidarity forever: an oral history of the IWW, p.3.
For instance, see Fred Hansen's recollections: "I didn't know about the revolutionary part at first, but as soon as I got in the organisation, I started reading an awful lot – not only IWW literature, but the communist literature, the anarchist literature, anybody's literature." In Stewart Bird, Dan Georgakas, and Deborah Shaffer (eds), Solidarity forever: an oral history of the IWW, p.189.
A recent series of pieces in the IWW’s Industrial Worker argues there’s at least four interpretations of the term ‘One Big Union’, some of which complement and some of which contradict one another: 1) every worker or most workers join the IWW; 2) a vision of a universalism/libertarian socialist principles for the IWW; 3) a vision of a new society (where unions run things instead of states, not unlike Marx’s comment about replacing governance of people with administration of things); and 4) a vision for revolutionary change (the class united). See http://libcom.org/library/industrial-unionism-one-big-unionism
1919: The murder of Wesley Everest: http://libcom.org/history/articles/murder-frank-everett
Stewart Bird, Dan Georgakas, and Deborah Shaffer (eds), Solidarity forever: an oral history of the IWW, p.179.
See http://www.marxists.org/history/usa/unions/iww/timeline.htm for a timeline up to 1983. The IWW has recently enjoyed something of a resurgence, most notably with the Starbucks Workers Union. As a living organisation in much changed circumstances, this is omitted from the analysis here. Many of the debates and contradictions of old live on. However, the contemporary debate of most interest to anarcho-syndicalists is that around the notion of ‘direct unionism’, which advocates a form of direct action unionism rather than reliance on representation and contracts. See http://libcom.org/tags/direct-unionism for a developing archive. See also the Recomposition blog, which contains much of the ‘direct unionism’ material as well as accounts of contemporary workplace activity along direct action lines: http://libcom.org/blog/recomposition
Bob Holton, British syndicalism 1900 – 1914, myths and realities, p.32.
However, there were attempts to form independent syndicalist unions in Britain before WWII. Some of these are documented in 'First Flight' by Albert Meltzer and 'Dare to be a Daniel' by Wilf McCartney, both published by the Kate Sharpley Library. The shop stewards’ committees in Clydeside during WWI had their roots in this agitation.
Quoted in Joseph White, Syndicalism in a mature industrial setting: the case of Britain, in Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe (eds), Revolutionary syndicalism, p.103.
Joseph White, Syndicalism in a mature industrial setting: the case of Britain, in Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe (eds), Revolutionary syndicalism, p.104.
The 1912 pamphlet ‘The Miners’ Next Step’ is one of the most famous examples of this union reform agenda, although it went largely unrealised. It also advocated use of parliament, but making MPs recallable by the unions, a novel compromise between anti-parliamentarism and parliamentary socialism. See http://libcom.org/library/miners-next-step-swmf-1912
1912: the syndicalist trials: http://libcom.org/history/articles/syndicalist-trials-1912
Joseph White, Syndicalism in a mature industrial setting: the case of Britain, in Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe (eds), Revolutionary syndicalism, p.115.
Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe, The rise and fall of revolutionary syndicalism, in Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe (eds), Revolutionary syndicalism, p.6.
Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe, The rise and fall of revolutionary syndicalism, in Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe (eds), Revolutionary syndicalism, p.7.
There is also the infamous case of the Casa del Obrero Mundial in Mexico which, during the Mexican Revolution, sided with the liberal government against Zapata’s insurgent peasants only to be repressed by the government once the peasant uprising was under control (see John M. Hart, Revolutionary syndicalism in Mexico in Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe (eds), Revolutionary syndicalism), and the aforementioned partial co-option of British syndicalism into a trade union reform movement.
Anton Pannekoek, Letter on workers’ councils: http://www.marxists.org/archive/pannekoe/1952/letter-councils.htm
Council communists love acronyms. We will only touch on the main ones here, but see the further reading for more detailed accounts.
The German word ‘union’ (Ger: 'union') has nothing to do with the word ‘trade union’ (Ger: ‘Gewerkschaft’). Both the council communist unions and the anarcho-syndicalist FAUD used the word ‘union’ in part to distinguish their revolutionary organisations from the mainstream trade unions.
Program of the AAUD: http://www.marxists.org/subject/germany-1918-23/dauve-authier/04.htm
Dave Graham, An introduction to left communism in Germany from 1914 to 1923: http://libcom.org/library/introduction-left-communism-germany-1914
Anton Pannekoek, Workers’ councils, p.60.
Anton Pannekoek, Workers’ councils, p.65-66.
Anton Pannekoek, Workers’ councils, p.61.
Anton Pannekoek, Workers’ councils, p.62.
In Pannekoek’s defence, it’s worth noting that he was writing at a time (1936) where revolutions had been breaking out in recent memory in numerous countries, and it may be unfair to generalise his writings from that specific context to the present day conditions. Pannekoek likely had the AAUD in mind when writing 'Workers’ councils'.
Amadeo Bordiga, Theses on the role of the Communist Party in the proletarian revolution: http://libcom.org/library/role_party_bordiga
Guidelines of the AAUD-E: http://libcom.org/history/guidelines-aaud-e
Otto Rühle, The revolution is not a party affair: http://libcom.org/library/the-revolution-is-not-a-party-affair-otto-ruhle
Otto Rühle, From the bourgeois to the proletarian revolution: http://libcom.org/library/bourgeois-proletarian-revolution-otto-ruhle
Gilles Dauvé and Denis Authier, The communist left in Germany 1918-1921 (appendix): http://libcom.org/library/appendix-i-groupuscular-phase
Dave Graham, An introduction to left communism in Germany 1914-1923: http://libcom.org/library/introduction-left-communism-germany-1914
Gilles Dauvé and Denis Authier, The communist left in Germany 1918-1921: http://libcom.org/library/communist-left-germany-1918-1921
Rudolf Rocker, Anarcho-syndicalism: http://libcom.org/library/anarcho-syndicalism-rudolf-rocker-chapter-6
Émile Pouget, Direct action: http://libcom.org/library/direct-action-emile-pouget
Émile Pouget, Direct action: http://libcom.org/library/direct-action-emile-pouget
Émile Pouget, Sabotage: http://libcom.org/library/3-labour-market
Émile Pouget, Direct action: http://libcom.org/library/direct-action-emile-pouget
Émile Pataud and Émile Pouget, How we shall bring about the revolution, p.18. Note the original French ‘syndicat’ is translated here simply as ‘union’ as opposed to ‘trade union’ in the English printed edition, since they are clearly talking about the revolutionary union and not ordinary trade unions.
Émile Pataud and Émile Pouget, How we shall bring about the revolution, p.63.
Émile Pataud and Émile Pouget, How we shall bring about the revolution, p.134-5.
The FORA’s founding pact of solidarity, quoted in Revolutionary unionism in Latin America – the FORA in Argentina: http://libcom.org/library/revolutionary-unionism-latin-america-fora-arge...
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.82.
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.103.
Quoted in Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.102-103.
See Revolutionary unionism in Latin America – the FORA in Argentina: http://libcom.org/library/revolutionary-unionism-latin-america-fora-arge...
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.49.
Hans Manfred Bock, Anarchosyndicalism in the German labour movement: a distinctive minority tradition in Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe (eds), Revolutionary syndicalism, p.59.
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.50.
Hans Manfred Bock, Anarchosyndicalism in the German labour movement: a distinctive minority tradition in Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe (eds), Revolutionary syndicalism, p. 72-73.
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.50-51.
Hans Manfred Bock, Anarchosyndicalism in the German labour movement: a distinctive minority tradition in Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe (eds), Revolutionary syndicalism, p.63.
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.68.
Guy Debord, Society of the spectacle, thesis 94: http://libcom.org/library/society-of-the-spectacle-debord-four
This argument is often advanced by those influenced by council communism, seemingly unaware that the council communist critique was aimed at the German trade unions (Gewerkschaften), and not the various revolutionary unions (anarcho-syndicalist FAUD, council communist AAUD, AAUD-E…). For example, Anton Pannekoek dedicates a section of his book ‘Workers’ councils’ to a scathing critique of trade unionism, and then praises the North American IWW just a few pages later.
Although we can’t, of course, know how a more successful revolution may have changed that course of history. Such counter factual speculations are of limited value, but the point of the isolation of the revolution stands.
Gaston Leval, Collectives in the Spanish revolution: http://libcom.org/library/collectives-leval-3
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.123.
Quoted in Abel Paz, Durruti in the Spanish revolution, p.457.
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.123.
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.124.
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.130.
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.126.
More precisely, ‘the CNT’ didn’t want this because it wasn’t a unitary whole. There were competing visions of what the CNT should be and this was the de facto compromise between the competing tendencies. Durruti commented that: “Some think the organisation is simply a vehicle for defending their economic interests. Others see it as an organisation that works with the anarchists for social transformation. Of course it makes sense that it's so difficult for the straight union activists and anarchists to get along.” Indeed, Fransisco Ascaso, referring to the ‘straight union activists’ of the Thirty, commented that “all organisations tow a great deal of dead weight behind them, and that is something the CNT cannot avoid.” Abel Paz, Durruti in the Spanish revolution, p.381 and p.288 respectively.
Abel Paz, Durruti in the Spanish revolution, p.342.
Peiro “was a member of a group affiliated to the FAI” (Stuart Christie, We, the anarchists! A study of the Iberian Anarchist Federation, p.50). He was also one of the signatories to the ‘Manifesto of the Thirty’ and thought conditions were not right for revolution, arguing for a less radical approach.
De Santillián was not a straight reformist and argued vociferously against conflating syndicalism with the labour movement in general (We, the anarchists! A study of the Iberian Anarchist Federation, p.16). But within the FAI he was one of the more reformist members in practice.
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.116.
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.126. In de Santillián’s defence, his argument was based on the impossibility of libertarian communism in one country. However, class collaboration is still not an anarcho-syndicalist solution.
Vadim Damier, Anarcho-syndicalism in the 20th century, p.138. De Santillián argued these reforms would lead to the kind of socio-economic changes the CNT stood for, but nonetheless this was a reformist position to take.
It tends to call itself ‘revolutionary syndicalism’ or even insist it is also anarcho-syndicalist. It is typically labelled by its critics ‘reformist syndicalism’. We’ve avoided either term here to avoid confusion.
In Maurizio Antonioli (ed), The international anarchist congress of Amsterdam (1907).
These splits were acrimonious, destructive and sometimes violent. But we cannot help thinking it was for the best, since revolutionary and reformist unionism cannot easily coexist in the same organisation outside of very specific conditions which bind them together.
Pierre Besnard, Anarcho-syndicalism and anarchism: http://libcom.org/library/anarchosyndicalism-anarchism-pierre-besnard
Vladimir Illych Lenin, Political report of the central committee to the extraordinary seventh congress of the Russian Communist Party (Bolshevik): http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1918/7thcong/01.htm
Quoted in Solidarity Federation, Anarcho-syndicalism in Puerto Real: from shipyard resistance to community control: http://solfed.org.uk/?q=pamphlets/puertoreal
Marcel van der Linden, Second thoughts on revolutionary syndicalism: http://libcom.org/library/second-thoughts-revolutionary-syndicalism-marc...
Rudolf Rocker, Anarcho-syndicalism: http://libcom.org/library/anarcho-syndicalism-rudolf-rocker-chapter-5
CNT, CGT y SO llaman a la huelga general el 29 de marzo: http://www.cnt.es/noticias/cnt-cgt-y-so-llaman-la-huelga-general-el-29-d...
Rudolf Rocker, Anarcho-syndicalism: http://libcom.org/library/anarcho-syndicalism-rudolf-rocker-chapter-3
Émile Pataud and Émile Pouget, How we shall bring about the revolution, p.63.
Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe, The rise and fall of revolutionary syndicalism, in Marcel van der Linden and Wayne Thorpe (eds), Revolutionary syndicalism, p.1.
James Heartfield, World war as class war: http://libcom.org/history/world-war-class-war
Quoted in Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson, Why did the West extend the franchise? Democracy, inequality and growth in historical perspective: http://scholar.harvard.edu/jrobinson/files/jr_west.pdf
Quoted in Ed Goddard, Red flags torn: http://libcom.org/library/red-flags-torn-brief-sketch-some-problems-unio...
See Joe Jacobs, Sorting out the postal strike, 1971: http://libcom.org/history/sorting-out-postal-strike-1971-joe-jacobs
Quotes and chronology from Endangered Phoenix et al, 1926-1985: So near – so far – a selective history of the British miners: http://libcom.org/library/chapter-05-1972-miners-strike
Endangered Phoenix et al, 1926-1985: So near – so far – a selective history of the British miners: http://libcom.org/library/chapter-05-1972-miners-strike
Michael Mann , Ruling class strategies and citizenship: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0038038587021003003
Andre Hoyles, General strike: France 1968 – a factory by factory account: http://libcom.org/library/general-strike-france-1968-factory-factory-acc...
Strikes in India today dwarf France 1968, e.g. see: http://libcom.org/blog/world%E2%80%99s-biggest-ever-strike-india-28th-fe..., although as a percentage of the workforce France 1968 was probably bigger (around 66%, 10m out of 15m workers).
Mouvement Communiste, May-June 1968 – a situation lacking in workers' autonomy: http://libcom.org/library/firsthand-account-montreuil-ca
Mouvement Communiste, May-June 1968 – a situation lacking in workers' autonomy: http://libcom.org/library/firsthand-account-montreuil-ca
Andre Hoyles, General strike: France 1968 – a factory by factory account: http://libcom.org/library/general-strike-france-1968-factory-factory-acc...
Situationist International, Enragés and Situationists in the occupations movement: http://libcom.org/library/enragés-situationists-occupations-movement
Mouvement Communiste, May-June 1968 – a situation lacking in workers' autonomy: http://libcom.org/library/conclusion-0
Mouvement Communiste, May-June 1968 – a situation lacking in workers' autonomy: http://libcom.org/library/conclusion-0
Unknown Fiat worker, Organising at Fiat, 1969: http://libcom.org/history/organising-fiat-1969
Unknown Fiat worker, Organising at Fiat, 1969: http://libcom.org/history/organising-fiat-1969
Robert Lumley, Institutionalization from below: The unions and social movements – 1970s Italy: http://libcom.org/history/institutionalization-below-unions-social-movem...
Robert Lumley, Institutionalization from below: The unions and social movements – 1970s Italy: http://libcom.org/history/institutionalization-below-unions-social-movem...
Mario Tronti, The strategy of refusal: http://libcom.org/library/strategy-refusal-mario-tronti
Steve Wright, Storming heaven: http://libcom.org/library/the-workerists-and-the-unions-in-italys-hot-au...
Unknown Fiat worker, Organising at Fiat, 1969: http://libcom.org/history/organising-fiat-1969
Mario Tronti, The strategy of refusal: http://libcom.org/library/strategy-refusal-mario-tronti
Andre Hoyles, General strike: France 1968 – a factory by factory account: http://libcom.org/library/general-strike-france-1968-factory-factory-acc...
Joe Hicks and Grahame Allen, A century of change: trends in UK statistics since 1900: http://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons/lib/research/rp99/rp99-111.pdf p.22.
Adam Smith, Lectures on jurisprudence, p.208.
Michel Foucault, Security, terror, population, p.47.
Gareth Morrell, Sara Scott, Di McNeish and Stephen Webster, The August riots in England: understanding the involvement of young people: http://www.natcen.ac.uk/media/769712/the%20august%20riots%20in%20england... p.34.
The Donovan Report, referenced in DAM, Winning the class war: http://libcom.org/library/winning-class-war-anarcho-syndicalist-strategy
See Beverly Silver, Forces of labour: http://libcom.org/library/forces-labor-beverly-j-silver
Mental Health Foundation, Mental health statistics: http://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/help-information/mental-health-statistics/
E.g. see David Gunnell, Nicos Middleton, Elise Whitley, Daniel Dorling and Stephen Frank, Why are suicide rates rising in young men but falling in the elderly? – a time-series analysis of trends in England and Wales 1950–1998: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0277-9536(02)00408-2 and Alfonso Ceccherini-Nelli and Stefan Priebe, Economic factors and suicide rates: associations over time in four countries: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00127-010-0275-2
Helena Smith, Greek woes drive up suicide rate: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/dec/18/greek-woes-suicide-rate-highest
Mark Fisher, Capitalist realism: http://libcom.org/library/capitalist-realism-mark-fisher p.19.
'Fairness means giving people what they deserve' (Conservatives); 'A future fair for all' (Labour); 'We will build a fairer Britain' (Liberal Democrats); 'Fair is worth fighting for' (Greens).
Brian Wheeler, Can UK political parties be saved from extinction?: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-12934148
The Economist, Unrest in peace: http://www.economist.com/node/21533365
Aufheben, The housing question: http://libcom.org/library/aufheben/aufheben-13-2005/the-housing-question
Aufheben, The return of the crisis – part 1: http://libcom.org/library/return-crisis-part-1 and part 2: http://libcom.org/library/return-crisis-part-2
Escalate Collective, Salt: http://libcom.org/library/salt-escalate-collective
Sam Lowry, 1978-1979: Winter of discontent: http://libcom.org/history/1978-1979-winter-of-discontent
Anton Pannekoek, Workers’ councils, p.62.
This quote, and indeed much of this section, is taken from DAM’s Winning the class war: http://libcom.org/library/winning-class-war-anarcho-syndicalist-strategy
Émile Pataud and Émile Pouget, How we shall bring about the revolution, p.63.
The cases of Workmates and Puerto Real form pamphlets #1 and #2 in our Theory and Practice series: http://solfed.org.uk/?q=pamphlets
Rudolf Rocker, Anarcho-syndicalism: http://libcom.org/library/anarcho-syndicalism-rudolf-rocker-chapter-3
As the revolutionary union develops the capacity to organise more effective struggles and begins to attract the attention of the state, the importance of Locals undertaking anti-militarist agitation amongst the troops increases. Particularly in garrison towns, fraternisation with the troops could be pursued, as could organising around ex-service personnel, military housing, or the workplace and other grievances of the families of troops. The exact content of effective anti-militarist activity will need to be worked out in practice, but it will increase in importance as the class struggle heats up.
The storming of the Bastille on the morning of the 14th July 1789 symbolises the outbreak of the French Revolution, where the rising capitalist class seized power from the monarchy. The Communist Party attempted a similar mythologising of the storming of the Winter Palace, staging a mass spectacle with over 100,000 spectators in 1920. These iconic events stand in for much messier and contradictory revolutionary and counter revolutionary processes.
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