Excerpts from "Intelligence" #45 (fwd)

The Anarchives (tao@lglobal.com)
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Subject: Excerpts from "Intelligence" #45

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INTELLIGENCE ISSN 1245-2122
N. 45 New Series, 7 October 1996
Publishing since 1980

Editor
Olivier Schmidt
(email oschmidt@francenet.fr;
web http://www.blythe.org/Intelligence;
tel/fax 33 1 40 51 85 19;
post ADI, 16 rue des Ecoles,
75005 Paris, France)

In this issue:

TABLE OF CONTENTS, N. 45, 7 October 1996

FRONTPAGE

U.S.A./GREAT BRITAIN - "JOINED AT THE HIP"
INTELLIGENCE COOPERATION p.1

TECHNOLOGY AND TECHNIQUES

SECURITY LAPSES AND OTHER PROBLEMS ON THE INTERNET p.2
TROUBLE WITH GQ360 ULTRA HIGH ALTITUDE PARACHUTE p.3
PEPPER SPRAY AND CS-CN TEAR GAS CONFUSION p.4
PARCEL BOMBS - New U.S. Postal Service Rules. p.5
GANGS - "Reasonable" and "Conservative" Statistics. p.6
BOMB SNIFFERS - Congressional "Consumers' Report". p.7
TELEPHONE SCAMS - New Paying Number Tactics. p.8
RECONVERSION - Ecological "Bombs Away". p.9
SOUND - A Virtual "Quack Box". p.10
PRIVACY - Beyond Lexis P-Trak Trouble. p.11
IMAGERY - Cheap Digital Maps for War Games. p.12
ECONOMIC INTELLIGENCE - French and English Manuals. p.13
SELF-DESTRUCT TAPS - Israeli Devices Analyzed. p.14
DEBIT CARDS - Japan Pays North Korea Via Poor Security. p.15

PEOPLE

U.S.A. - FREDERIC WHITEHURST p.16
ROBERT CHAEGON KIM p.17
GREAT BRITAIN/INDIA - PETER BLEACH p.18
BULGARIA - ANDREY LUKANOV p.19
U.S.A. - Kevin D. Mitnick. p.20
Clark Hager. p.21
Henry Billingsley. p.22
John W. DeCamp. p.23
GREAT BRITAIN - Officer "T". p.24
Fitzroy Maclean. p.25
Diarmuid O'Neil. p.26
RUSSIA - Alexander Nikitin. p.27
MEXICO/U.S.A. - Celestino Castillo. p.28
CUBA/U.S.A. - Carlos Fleites. p.29
COLOMBIA/U.S.A. - Farouk Yanine Diaz. p.30
COLOMBIA/GREAT BRITAIN - Philip Halden. p.31
ARGENTINA/U.S.A. - Jose Siderman. p.32
ISRAEL - David Ivry. p.33
Mordechai Vanunu. p.34

AGENDA
COMING EVENTS FROM NOW TO 15 NOVEMBER 1996 p.35

INTELLIGENCE AROUND THE WORLD

U.S.A. - GULF WAR SYNDROME GETS A MILITARY EXPLANATION p.36
FBI NCIC 2000 ALIVE AND KICKING p.37

U.S.A./ISRAEL - Election Time Roll Call & Collection. p.38

GREAT BRITAIN - BETTER CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE
WITH VICTIMOLOGY p.39
PSA MEETING FINDS FAULTS WITH EVERYBODY p.40
SECRECY LIFTED ON DOUNREAY NUCLEAR ACCIDENT p.41
Civvies Train Military Copter Pilots. p.42

NORTHERN IRELAND - THE FALSE PEACE FALLS APART p.43
FRANCE - SECURE NATIONAL E-CASH SERVICE GOES ONLINE p.44

BELGIUM - AGUSTA BACK ON THE AGENDA p.45
ANOTHER MAJOR SCANDAL INVOLVING HIGH OFFICIALS p.46

GERMANY - HOME-GROWN SATELLITE AND SIGINT CONFLICTS p.47
SWITZERLAND - Archives Find Nazi Agents in Red Cross. p.48
NORWAY - THE "OSLO/ANC" CONNECTION REVEALED p.49
SWEDEN - E.U. FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ON TRIAL p.50
CENTRAL EUROPE - "BRASS TACKS" SECURITY ANALYSIS p.51
UGANDA - DIRTY LITTLE SECRETS SHARED WITH THE BRITS p.52

---------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 45, 7 October 1996, p. 19

BULGARIA - ANDREY LUKANOV

On 2 October, Andrei Lukanov, a Russian-born former member of
the Bulgarian Central Committee, Prime Minister in 1990, boss
of the TopEnergy Russian-Bulgarian joint venture (INT, N.
39/5), was shot to death at his home. TopEnergy, created last
year with help from the Bulgarian corporation, Multigroup,
controls the import of Russian gas and crude oil, and its
reexport to Greece, to avoid Turkey's U.S.-backed stranglehold
on Russian oil shipments through the Bosporus (INT, N. 33/53).
Lukanov was also apparently connected with Tron, a large
Bulgarian holding company which appeared out of nowhere soon
after the fall of the Communist regime, and its Sunnyvale,
California, company in Silicon Valley, Pont Peripherals, half
of which belongs to Waltham Electronics. Silicon Valley is
also where Bisser Dimitrov, "Lukanov's man in California", got
his start (INT, N. 39/51). Bulgarian "businessman" Dimitrov,
head of the firm GigaStorage, was the center of a recent
financial/political scandal in the region of Belfort, France
(INT, N. 33/15).

But Topenergy recently removed Lukanov and replaced him with
none other than Iliya Pavlov, president of Multigroup (INT, N.
33/15). Mr. Pavlov confirmed the news and told reporters that
Lukanov had "caused friction" between Topenergy and the
Bulgarian government. Mr. Lukanov, on his side, told reporters
that such a change had not taken place. In the meantime, the
removal was also confirmed by Topenergy executives (INT, N.
42/43). Observers have noted that Lukanov's position in
Topenergy was in flagrant conflict of interest with his status
as member of parliament for the ruling Socialist Party.
Topenergy had applied for a license to operate all domestic and
transit gas pipelines on Bulgarian territory and to build new
facilities. The government delayed its response until two
weeks past the legal deadline, and then announced that a
commission was being set up to work out the conditions for
issuing such a license by mid-September.

On 12 April Ivo Jancev, a former member of Bulgarian
intelligence and a leading figure of Multigroup was found dead.
Although police concluded that Jancev had committed suicide,
Jancev's former intelligence service colleagues are "conducting
their own investigation" into what may be either a battle
between former senior intelligence officials now involved in
business, or in a Multigroup "internal house cleaning" (INT, N.
37/17). Following the October 1995 assassination attempt
against Macedonian President, Kiro Gligorov, press reports had
mentioned possible involvement of Multigroup in the car
bombing. As for Topenergy, it was created 1995 as a joint
venture between Gasprom of Russia and a Bulgarian state
company, Bulgargas. Gasprom's boss, Rem Vyakhirev, is said to
have more power in Russia than President Boris Yeltsin, has
total control of Topenergy. With presidential elections coming
up, the media is wondering whether the motives for Lukanov's
murder were political or economic, a distinction which seems to
have little relevance in the case of someone such as Lukanov.

---------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 45, 7 October 1996, p. 37

U.S.A.

FBI NCIC 2000 ALIVE AND KICKING

Internet "FBI-watchers" quickly noticed the recent withdrawal
from the Bureau's web page of all mention of the monthly
newsletter on the NCIC 200 computerization and modernization
program of the National Crime Information Center (NCIC), and
jumped to the conclusion that NCIC 2000 "is being scrapped".
"Intelligence" asked the FBI which quite simply replied that,
since the newsletter was supposed to be A monthly and the last
issue was dated May 1996, it was withdrawn from the web page.
Not only did this get some action on the Internet, it also got
some action at headquarters where a "dedicated staff" of one
person has been specifically given the task of putting the NCIC
2000 newsletter out on time every month. As for NCIC 2000,
according to the FBI, it is "on track", "moving ahead at full
speed" and encountering "no known problems".

COMMENT -- In April 1995, we announced that the FBI began
modernizing the NCIC in 1992 and Harris Corp. got to work, in
March 1993, on NCIC 2000 (INT, N. 13/8), selecting Printrack
International Inc.'s Automated Fingerprint Identification
System (AFIS) and a Combined DNA Indexing System (CODIS), which
has already been installed with AFIS in some 30 locations in 17
states. Supposedly NCIC 2000 will also include the capacity to
identify a criminal's cholesterol level from the fingerprints
he or she leaves. However, this June, we noted that a GAO
report on "entry time problems" at the NCIC computer database
of wanted criminals found that the FBI, and other federal
agencies, entered fugitives long after arrest warrants were
issued and sometimes even after they had been arrested (INT, N.
39/32). These problems seem to have more to do with field
office procedures than trouble at headquarters with NCIC.

---------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 45, 7 October 1996, p. 38

U.S.A./ISRAEL - Election Time Roll Call & Collection.
According to press reports, supposedly based on analysis of
Federal Election Commission (FEC) figures, pro-Israeli
political action committee contributions have already reached
more than $3.8 million as of 30 June while the committees
themselves have apparently reported $5.5 million in
contributions. The FEC figures don't include presidential
campaign contributions or money given directly to campaigns.
But anti-Israeli political action is also heating up with the
opening of the "'USS Liberty' Essay Contest" in preparation for
the 7-9 June 1997 30th anniversary reunion of "USS Liberty"
survivors. The ship was an electronic surveillance vessel in
international waters off the coast of Israel during the 1967
Six Day War which Israeli aircraft attacked for two hours,
killing 34 U.S. servicemen and wounding 171 others. The ship
was so badly damaged that it had to be scrapped. Israel still
makes the untenable claim that it thought the "USS Liberty" was
an Egyptian horse carrier, "El Quseir", and the U.S. Congress,
careful not to offend moneyed pro-Israeli campaign
contributors, has never investigated the incident. U.S. law
requires investigation of grave violations of international
law, but the "USS Liberty" affair still remains today the only
major maritime incident in U.S. history not investigated by
Congress.

---------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 45, 7 October 1996, p. 46

BELGIUM

ANOTHER MAJOR SCANDAL INVOLVING HIGH OFFICIALS

The Dutch police, in collaboration with Belgian authorities,
are examining evidence that several senior figures in Belgian
law enforcement circles have been deeply involved in drug
trafficking. On 14 March, Belgian drug trafficker and police
informer, Martin Swennen, was shot and killed by one Ton van E.
in an Amsterdam bar following a dispute in which Van E. had
accused Swennen of being a police informer. The murder
investigation revealed that Swennen had been an informer for
Belgian Gendarmerie officer Willy van Mechelen, 53, a notorious
and controversial criminal investigator who had repeatedly been
suspected of involvement in drug schemes. However, Van
Mechelen has always managed to "come away clean" and, in fact,
has risen to become the second in command with the Antwerp BOB
investigation brigade. He is currently in custody awaiting
trial: three of his accomplices have already testified that
they worked for van Mechelen importing drugs through the port
of Antwerp. Shortly before being murdered, Swennen had turned
to the Rotterdam CID criminal intelligence department, where
subsequently three drug runners had been working with him for
months, resulting in dossiers full of trafficking information.

Swennen not only told the Dutch cops about his connections with
well-known Dutch drug traffickers such as Johan Verhoek, but
also gave detailed accounts of Van Mechelen's criminal schemes
and implicated other senior Belgian law enforcement officers
such as Colonel Herman Luijten, a liaison officer at the
Belgian embassy in The Hague. Swennen had an appointment on 15
March to give a statement to Belgian investigating magistrate,
J. Mahieu, head of the Van Mechelen investigation, but he was
killed the evening before. Investigators think that a possible
leak in the Rotterdam CID caused Swennen's death: some weeks
before, in February 1996, Rotterdam CID officer, Richard
Lengton, was arrested after having been caught in the act of
selling confidential dossiers to criminals for 10,000 guilders.

Another high-placed official fingered by Swennen before he died
is Belgian magistrate Walter De Smet, a former investigating
magistrate who is currently on the Comite P, the police
oversight committee (INT, N. 38/1). Mr. De Smet is accused of
having helped Van Mechelen with his drug imports by sabotaging
investigations against him. De Smet denied recently, on BRT
radio, that he had facilitated Van Mechelen's shady activities.
Instead he has pointed to an anonymous and very senior civil
servant whom he says sabotaged his attempts to prosecute Van
Mechelen. Judicial sources believe this person to be Antwerp's
highest boss in the public prosecutor's office, prosecutor
general Van Camp. On 30 September, behind closed doors, the
Belgian parliament discussed the matter which has stirred up a
lot of controversy. Judicial authorities in Antwerp have
confirmed that there is "evidence" of suspicious activity on
the part of a number of Belgian investigators, and they have
asked the Dutch authorities for more details.

Swennen had asserted that he himself was protected by Van
Mechelen and Luijten for money. An international warrant
issued against him in October 1995 somehow got lost at the
Dutch CRI National Criminal Intelligence Service for six
months. Col. Luijten is said to have received 35,000 guilders
from Van Mechelen to make sure the warrant disappeared. So
far, the CRI can only explain that the warrant was lost
"through administrative failures". Col. Luijten's possible
involvement is now under investigation.

Dutch and Belgian investigators at first distrusted Swennen's
incredible stories about a drug organization headed by some of
Belgium's most senior law enforcement officials who facilitated
drug imports for many notorious Dutch and Belgian drug barons
through Antwerp harbor. But now investigators in both
countries are believed to have dug up so much supporting
evidence that the dead snitch's allegations can no longer be
ignored.

---------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 45, 7 October 1996, p. 47

GERMANY

HOME-GROWN SATELLITE AND SIGINT CONFLICTS

The German defense ministry faces opposition to its signal
intelligence (Sigint) and surveillance satellite (Imint) plans
from two very different "domestic" quarters. After much
prodding from French President Jacques Chirac, German
Chancellor Helmut Kohl is pressuring his defense minister,
Volker Ruehe, to support two spy satellite projects with
France: the Helios 2 optical surveillance satellite and the
Horus radar imaging surveillance satellite. So far, Mr. Ruehe
has resisted the Chancellor's pressing invitation. Indeed, the
German defense minister has informed his French counterpart,
Charles Millon, that he has already allocated the only
available funds for Eurofighter 2000. The German defense
minister's assessment is that his forces do not need to know
about supposedly "strategic" movements in the Chad sand dunes.
The French, however, are keeping the pressure up and Chancellor
Kohl and President Chirac hope to reach a final decision during
their planned meeting in December.

The German air force faces opposition from a very different
"domestic" quarter. Its plans to install a Sigint listening
post to monitor high frequency (HF) communications in Eastern
Europe faces strong opposition from local politicians in
Berlin. The installation, in Fernmeldesektor D (communications
sector D), which would be constructed in Gatow, would require
the logging of 3,000 trees in a 300 m diameter circle, with a
protective circle 1,600 m in diameter, and special permits for
the use of any electrical appliances within 2,500 meters. The
installation would be operated by a Sigint unit currently
stationed in Feuchtwangen and would be part of the Third Air
force Division. In response to parliamentary questioning by MP
Wolfgang Behrendt, assistant defense minister Peter Wichert
said the installation was approved in early 1995 as part of
plans to centralize HF monitoring within the German defense
ministry. According to Mr. Wichert, "all the components of
this plan are to be realized".

---------------------------------------------

Intelligence, N. 45, 7 October 1996, p. 49

NORWAY

THE "OSLO/ANC" CONNECTION REVEALED

The Norwegian Government, using money laundering and other
covert financial techniques, transferred millions of dollars of
public funds to anti-apartheid activists during the 20-year
period leading up to the collapse of the white racist regime.
The financial aid, amounting to almost $350 million, went to
the families of imprisoned African National Congress members
and was also used to finance political agitation in the 1970s
and 1980s. The Oslo Government used intermediaries --
generally members of the Church of Norway (CoN) -- to smuggle
cash into South Africa. A Norwegian intelligence agent, Bjarne
Lindstrom, working under diplomatic cover from the Norwegian
consul-general's office in Cape Town, distributed money to the
impoverished black residents of the townships. A group of
local businessmen also used the CoN's Durban office to purchase
"financial rands" (introduced when South Africa needed hard
currency and issued at 30 percent above the normal rate of
exchange) which the CoN then distributed to ANC activists. The
"Oslo/ANC" connection is detailed in a recently published book,
"Mandela's Land", written by Tomm Kristianen, the African
correspondent for Norwegian radio from 1990 to 1994. His
account of the covert support for the ANC is confirmed by Svenn
Stray, foreign minister from 1981 to 1986, and by Trond
Bakkevig, general secretary of the CoN, who smuggled "hard
currency" concealed in a body-belt into South Africa on at
least five occasions.

*

Copyright ADI 1996, reproduction in any form forbidden
without explicit authorization from the ADI. A one year
subscription (23 issues with full index) is US $315.

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