A - I n f o s
a multi-lingual news service by, for, and about anarchists **

News in all languages
Last 40 posts (Homepage) Last two weeks' posts

The last 100 posts, according to language
Castellano_ Deutsch_ Nederlands_ English_ Français_ Italiano_ Polski_ Português_ Russkyi_ Suomi_ Svenska_ Türkçe_ The.Supplement
First few lines of all posts of last 24 hours || of past 30 days | of 2002 | of 2003 | of 2004

Syndication Of A-Infos - including RDF | How to Syndicate A-Infos
Subscribe to the a-infos newsgroups
{Info on A-Infos}

(en) US, RALEIGH, N.C. - North Carolinia, Media: Tar Heel anarchists say vandalism a statement against system

From Worker <a-infos-en@ainfos.ca>
Date Thu, 25 Nov 2004 11:01:37 +0100 (CET)


________________________________________________
A - I N F O S N E W S S E R V I C E
News about and of interest to anarchists
http://ainfos.ca/ http://ainfos.ca/index24.html
________________________________________________

A person who identify with the anarchist movement say an attack on the
state Republican Party headquarters building three days after the
general election was a statement against the political system.
Three people were arrested and charged with felony damage. The
suspects, who were bailed out of the Wake County Jail after
money was raised with an Internet appeal, face a Monday hearing.
Vanessa Zuloaga, 24, Melissa Brown, 18, and David Hensley, 20,
all of Columbia, S.C., face felony charges of causing malicious
damage to property by use of an incendiary device.

Anarchist Steve Roberts, 22, of Winston-Salem, who says he did
not take part in the vandalism at GOP headquarters, said
destruction of property pales next to the destruction of the human
spirit committed by the political structure.

"The system is incredibly flawed, and has been historically,"
Roberts said. "It is not a product of George W. Bush. It's not a
product of the GOP. It's a product of economic interest over
human rights interests, of capitalist interests over human
interests."

When police arrived at the GOP building on the night of Nov. 5,
they found about 20 people in black clothes attacking it. A man
who lives on Forest Street, next to the headquarters, discovered
two women near his garage shedding black clothes and prevented
them from leaving until police arrived.

Raleigh Police Chief Jane Perlov briefed Mayor Charles Meeker
on the incident, and Meeker said he was asked not to release
information.

Assistant District Attorney Tom Ford also declined to discuss the
case.

But incident seemed to energize anarchists and those who support
them.

Last week, a panel discussion was held at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill and a small, weekly student peace
demonstration at N.C. State University attracted scores of
participants.

Elena Everett, a spokeswoman for the peace group, said the event
also served as a protest against agents with the FBI's Joint
Terrorism Task Force knocking on doors around campus to ask
questions about the vandalism.

Michael Saylor, the supervisory special agent in the FBI's Raleigh
office, said task force agents were sent to question people about
the incident, which occurred a day after a similar attack damaged
the GOP headquarters in Buffalo, N.Y.

"We were looking to try and identify, just as the Raleigh police
were, just who was responsible for the destruction," Saylor said.

Bill Peaslee, the state Republican Party's chief of staff, said
repairing the damage cost more than $5,000. He said windows
were broken and slogans spray-painted on the building, including
the "circle A" symbol of anarchism. Someone also tried to set
something afire in the building.

Outside, an effigy with the heads of President Bush and U.S. Sen.
John Kerry, the Democratic presidential candidate, was lit but did
not burn completely.

Roberts and another anarchist, David Phillips of Charlotte, said
the damage was a statement of belief following the Nov. 2
election, in which Bush was re-elected.

"I don't have a moral or ethical problem with breaking windows
when entire buildings are being blown up in Fallujah," Roberts
said.

According to Roberts, North Carolina anarchists usually work in
quiet ways, such as feeding the hungry and organizing against
timber interests in western North Carolina.

Phillips said he has found it difficult to go public with his political
views because the media oversimplify anarchism by equating it
with violence.

"This is a very complex movement," he said. "There are
anarchists who are totally pacifist. There are those who won't
engage in violent arguments, much less violence."

Information from: News & Observer
=======================
Copied from infoshop.org


*******
********
****** The A-Infos News Service ******
News about and of interest to anarchists
******
INFO: http://ainfos.ca/org http://ainfos.ca/org/faq.html
HELP: a-infos-org@ainfos.ca
SUBSCRIPTION: send mail to lists@ainfos.ca with command in
body of mail "subscribe (or unsubscribe) listname your@address".

Options for all lists at http://www.ainfos.ca/options.html


A-Infos Information Center