A - I n f o s
a multi-lingual news service by, for, and about anarchists **

News in all languages
Last 30 posts (Homepage) Last two weeks' posts

The last 100 posts, according to language
Castellano_ Català_ Deutsch_ English_ Français_ Italiano_ Polski_ Português_ Russkyi_ Suomi_ Svenska_ Türkçe_ All_other_languages
{Info on A-Infos}

(en) Anarchist Age Weekly Review No. 520 14th October ­ 20th October, 2002

From philmcc@melbpc.org.au
Date Fri, 18 Oct 2002 07:39:57 -0400 (EDT)


 ________________________________________________
      A - I N F O S  N E W S  S E R V I C E
            http://www.ainfos.ca/
        http://ainfos.ca/index24.html
 ________________________________________________

NO GLOBALISATION WITHOUT DIRECT DEMOCRACY ­ ANARCHIST MEDIA 
INSTITUTE
"WE SWEAR BY THE SOUTHERN CROSS TO STAND TRULY BY EACH OTHER 
AND FIGHT TO
DEFEND OUR RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES" ­ EUREKA REBELLION OATH 1854
 
 THE WAR AGAINST TERROR?
The mass murder of nearly two hundred people, going about their business in
a tourist resort, many of them Australians, is a calculated political act.
In the disbelief, anger, revulsion and utter powerlessness felt by those
caught up in the events and those who witness the drama on the mass media,
it's easy to dismiss the bombings as an act of evil carried out by deranged
individuals and groups who are part of a world wide network of evil.

Terrorism has been and continues to be an integral component of the
political process.  Mass murder on a scale that dwarfs the deaths in Bali,
has been and continues to be carried out by Nation States for political,
religious, ideological and nationalist reasons.  The twentieth century was
littered with examples of political and national leaders who had absolute
State power, use that power to impose their will on the people they ruled,
through the use of terror.  Terror is a tactic used by the State and by
groups who want to seize State power and use that power to further their
religious, ideological or nationalist objectives.

The carnage caused by the bombings in Bali, although a relatively new
experience for the Australian people, is unfortunately a fact of life for
Indonesians.  The Indonesian people weathered one of the significant
genocide's of the 20th Century in 1965, and for the next thirty years had to
live under a brutal military dictatorship, supported by successive
Australian and United States governments.  Since Suharto was forced to step
down in 1995, the Indonesian archipelago has been destabilised by remnants
of the old dictatorship, who want to make the country ungovernable, so they
can seize power with minimal public opposition.  Muslim fundamentalist
organisations have been the vehicle they have been used to torment trouble
in Indonesia.  Since the economic meltdown in Indonesia in 1997 and the
imposition of International Monetary Fund and World Bank conditions on
continued loans, the economic burden has fallen on tens of millions of
Indonesians, who eke out a hand to mouth existence.

The message propagated by Muslim fundamentalists among the poor and the
dispossessed has borne fruit and with the financial backing of some of
Suharto's old supporters and remnants of the Indonesian armed forces, they
have been able to create a climate where destabilisation through terror,
achieves results.  It would be a mistake to view the deaths in Bali as
something that could have been avoided if intelligence agencies had more
information, or the Indonesian government had taken a stronger stand against
certain groups.  The war on terror cannot be won by military and
paramilitary means.  It can only be won by eradicating the conditions that
breed the hopelessness and despair that creates the moral, intellectual and
physical conditions that make terrorism a viable political option.

What at first may seem to be an impossible task has much more chance of
succeeding than the ridiculous concept of a military war on terrorism.  A
war which can never be successful and which never ends.  A war which creates
the conditions which encourage and nurtures the growth of terror as a
political philosophy, that is pursued by those who claim to be acting
against terrorism and those who have embraced terrorism as a political
weapon.  

TOPSY-TURVY WORLD
A decade after the privitisation of many essential services, the cost
savings that were promised have not materialised.  Consequences of
privitisation range from increased charges, loss of assets that generated or
could have generated profits for the public, poorer services to the shifting
of the cost burden, from the community to the individual.

Historically, governments had become involved in the provision of essential
services, because of the inability of the private sector to provide the
service at a reasonable cost to all sections of the community.  Dismantling
of the public sector has had consequences that could have been avoided if
those governments that embarked on this path had taken a few minutes to
examine the reasons why the State in the past, actively pursued policies to
take over public services from the private sector.

Ten years later, it's becoming obvious to many consumers that they were sold
a very sick pup. The single most important reason the State took over the
provision and running of public services, was to spread the burden for the
cost of these services across the community.  Cross-subsidisation spread the
burden from the individual to the collective.  The disadvantaged and some of
the more isolated sections of the community, were able to access essential
services they would never be able to afford when the user pay philosophy,
that was at the heart of the privatised system, was in operation.

Currently, regional, rural and disadvantaged consumers are being placed
under increasing pressure to subsidise essential services that are used by
highly centralised urban users.  In the rush to cherry pick the more
profitable customers, in the deregulated market place, private corporations
are offering them sweetheart deals that are not being offered to other
consumers.  The burden of cost is now shifting from those who can afford to
pay, to those who can't.  In order to avert an electoral backlash,
governments have been forced to intervene and hand over public money to
private corporations to subsidise these consumers.

A decade after the privitisation revolution, Australians are being saddled
with a hybrid system, where losses made by private corporations that run
privatised services, are subsidised by the taxpayer and profits go straight
into the overseas head offices of transnational corporations that have
little, if any, intention of maintaining and expanding the system, without
the injection of massive amounts of public funds.  It's now obvious, even to
the most ardent supporters of privitisation, that privitisation has failed
the public on all fronts.

MANNA FROM HEAVEN
The deaths of nearly two hundred people, many of them Australian, as a
consequence of the bombing outrage in Bali, is being used as a bargaining
chip by a government that knew its ASIO bill would be rejected when debated
in the Senate.  Barely 24 hours after the massacre, the Howard regime has
re-opened negotiations with the opposition, to pass the more contentious
elements of the ASIO bill.  If, as a consequence of the hysteria surrounding
this outrage, this bill is passed, ASIO will be given unprecedented powers
to detain, interrogate and imprison people without charges being laid,
because they may inadvertently have information which ASIO believes may help
them carry out their investigations.

The brutal bombing in Bali is being exploited by a government, that in the
rush to protect parliamentary democracy, wants to remove those few common
law rights Australians enjoy, that allow them to freely associate and
protest without the threat of arbitrary detention, interrogation and
imprisonment.  The threat posed to Australians by the ASIO bill is far worse
than any terrorist threat or outrage.

The broad coalition of groups that convinced the Labor Party to block the
legislation in the Senate, needs to re-apply pressure to the Labor Party to
ensure that it does not back track on its word and pass the ASIO bill.
Removing what few freedoms people enjoy in this country to protect our
rapidly diminishing rights and freedoms, plays into the hands at the very
people who committed this massacre.  Those people who pursue a terrorist
agenda, do so with two main aims in mind, they want to destabilise society
by generating a climate of fear and they want the State to take away those
rights and freedoms which set us apart from more authoritarian governments
and social movements.

To succumb to the hysteria, calling for more police powers during the
aftermath of a terrorist outrage, is to give those people who believe they
can implement their political agenda through terror, a significant victory.

KILLING OFF THE AUSTRALIAN
COMPETITION AND CONSUMER COMMISSION
The A.C.C.C. under Alan Fels, has been able to create a climate of fear
among Australia's C.E.O.'s and corporate watchdogs.  Although the A.C.C.C.
has precious little power to protect consumers under current legislation,
Fels has by cleverly using the media, been able to create a climate that has
been able to at least put the spotlight on corporate behaviour.

Having the light shone on their business affairs, has not impressed those
corporate board members who are used to receiving Orders of Australia for
their predatory behaviour.  The current Federal government has been unhappy
with the A.C.C.C.'s activities and has not succumbed to the public pressure
that has been generated by the A.C.C.C.'s activities, to pass legislation
that would make C.E.O.'s personally responsible for their companies
behaviour and see them face jail sentences for price fixing and
anti-competitive behaviour.  Currently the few cases that the A.C.C.C. wins
in court under the current legislation, results in financial penalties which
are paid directly by the company, not the C.E.O.'s responsible.

Alan Fels' decision to flag his retirement in 2002, has given the Federal
government the time it requires to stack the A.C.C.C. with business friendly
appointments.  In the same way it has stacked the A.B.C. board with
appointments, who are more interested in protecting the government from
criticism than protecting the A.B.C., it plans to appoint people to senior
positions of the A.C.C.C. who are more likely to be business friendly than
consumer friendly.  The difference this time, is that the State Labor
governments need to ratify the Federal government's appointments to the
A.C.C.C.  Going on their past record of pulling out all stops to win
corporate support, I wouldn't be holding your breath, waiting for them to
oppose Federal government business friendly appointments to the A.C.C.C.

APATHY?
Two years after hundreds of thousands of Serbians poured out into the
streets and ended Milosevic's reign, less than 50% of electors turned out to
cast a ballot for a new president.  Serb's had the unenviable task of
choosing between Vujislav Kostunica, a nationalist, and Miroljub Labus,
Deputy Prime Minister and free marketer.  Not much of a choice as far as
Serbian voters were concerned.

Since the downfall of Milosevic, Serb's have been forced to take the brunt
of "market reforms" that have removed what little control they had over
their economy and placed them in the hands of "carpet baggers".  The
much-touted flood of foreign capital, has not materialised and people
continue to live in a parlous economic State.  The economic gains they were
promised if they embraced a market economy, have not eventuated and people
are asking themselves why they bothered to expel Milosevic, for the free
market apologists who now make up the government.

Their refusal to participate in elections is not due to apathy, but to
despair.  They despair about the limitations of the parliamentary system.  A
system, which promises so much, but delivers so little.  Serbia is one of
the few countries in the world that refuses to accept election results if
fewer than 50% of eligible electors cast a ballot.  If the same law was in
place in the United States, not one candidate would have been elected to the
Congress or the Senate.  Even the White House would have remained empty,
because fewer than 50% of electors cast a ballot in the last United States
Presidential election.

What happened in Serbia on the weekend, is the latest in a long line of
examples where people have discovered the limitations of parliamentary rule
and refuse to participate in the electoral farce.  Fortunately for those few
parliamentary devotees that still exist, the Serbian parliament is keen to
pass legislation that removes the 50% rule.  As they keep telling the
Serbian electorate, if it's good enough for the United States, it's good
enough for us. 

ANARCHIST QUESTION AND ANSWER
Q. How will radical egalitarian social change occur?
A. There are four ways in which real power is transferred in a society.  At
any one time you can see variations of all four methods occuring somewhere
in the world.  The most common way of transferring power is a military coup,
normally this occurs when the State is faced with threats from a movement
that wants radical change.
A method popular with Marxists and nationalists revolves around opening up
areas of conflict using a guerilla model.  Small disciplined groups of men
and women launch armed struggle against the State attempting to challenge
those in power and create the necessary conditions for the mass mobilisation
of the people they need to seize power from the State.  The 20th century was
awash with examples of guerilla struggles.  A few examples that come to mind
today are the guerilla struggles carried out by Marxist guerillas in
Columbia and Nepal.  The nationalist struggles conducted by he Tamils in Sri
Lanka, as well as the religious fundamentalist guerilla wars that are
occuring in Uganda that are being carried out by the Christian Army of God
and those carried out by Muslim fundamentalists in the Southern Philippines
and Aceh in Indonesia.
Guerilla warfare is long and bloody and normally ends when one side is
crushed or as commonly happens both sides are forced to the negotiation
table because of war weariness.  The type of struggle that is being carried
out in Southern Mexico by the Zapitastas and the Palestinians in the
occupied territories in Israel, is an example of what happens when the bulk
of the population, support a rebellion.  A dual power situation occurs when
those who are involved in the rebellion have enough power to create a
society within a society and a State within a State.  Dual power situations
where social movements form their own infrastructure, is a tactic that is
used by political and social movements that pose a real threat to those in
power.
The last and most exciting example of how the focus of power can shift
almost overnight happens when the internal contradictions within a community
are so extreme that the whole deck of cards collapses in a few days.  What
has just happened in Argentina is an example of how internal contradictions
within a society can create a climate where radical egalitarian social
change becomes a real possibility.
NEXT WEEK: Iıll examine in which one of these contexts anarchist movements
have blossomed.
ACTION BOX 
TEMPORARY CESSATION OF PUBLICATION OF ANARCHIST AGE WEEKLY 
REVIEW.
23-12-2002 TO 19-01-2003.
Our recent attempts to decrease our debt to manageable levels have been a
dismal failure.  In our 11th year of publication, we find that our very
existence as a weekly is now in doubt.  The Anarchist Media Institute is a
voluntary organisation whose income is derived from donations from members
and supporters as well as subscribers to the Anarchist Age Weekly Review.
Current subscription levels cover 30% of our total costs.
Nobody in the organisation receives any money for their labour and all
contributions are voluntary.  Costs we have no control over are: postage,
printing, some typing, money to pay for a 24 hour answering service and
subscription and studio fees to a community radio station 3CR to broadcast
the Anarchist World This Week throughout Australia on the National Community
Radio satellite.  We can no longer expect a small group of faithful
supporters to repeatedly bail us out of our financial difficulties.  We need
to develop new methods by which we can raise funds so we can continue to
broadcast, publish and initiate new campaigns and support old ones to spread
the anarchist message.
Instead of taking a 2 week break as we usually do at the end of the year, we
will be taking a 4 week break from publishing the Anarchist Age Weekly
Review.  This will allow us to save money to reduce our debt.  The Weekly
will not be published from 23-12-2002 to 10-01-2003.  Between now and then,
if by some chance we are able to wipe out our debts, we will recommence
publishing on the 13-01-2003, one week earlier.
Ways you can help:
A. DONATIONS ­ Make out cheques or money orders to Libertarian Workers.
B. BUY A SUBSCRIPTION FOR A FRIEND OR YOUR LOCAL LIBRARY.  $50 = 50 
ISSUES.
C. RE-SUBSCRIBE AHEAD OF TIME.
D. JOIN THE DOLLAR A DAY GROUP.  WE CURRENTLY HAVE 5 MEMBERS.  If 
we had 30
members who donated a dollar a day, we could make ends meet.
E. ORGANISE AN EVENT TO RAISE MONEY FOR THE ANARCHIST MEDIA 
INSTITUTE.  As
we spend most of our time broadcasting, publishing and agitating, we donıt
have the time to organise such events ­ but you may have the time.
F. DOWNLOAD THE WEEKLY FROM OUR INTERNET SITE ­ Saves us postage 
costs.
G. IF YOU DOWNLOAD THE WEEKLY FROM THE INTERNET SITE, SEND US A
SUBSCRIPTION.  $50 = 50 ISSUES.
H. SEND US 45 CENT STAMPS.  THE MORE THE BETTER.
As we live in a capitalist society, we have no option but to cover our
debts.  We encourage you to support us.  Every dollar, every stamp helps.
IF YOU ARE SENDING AMOUNTS OF $20 OR LESS ­ DO YOURSELF A FAVOUR 
AND SAVE ON
MONEY ORDER AND BANKING FEES AND SEND US 45 CENT STAMPS.  
Otherwise make out
cheques or money orders to LIBERTARIAN WORKERS and send them to P.O. BOX 
20,
PARKVILLE 3052, MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA.  -  THANKS FOR YOUR 
SUPPORT.

AUSTRALIAN RADICAL HISTORY
THE EUREKA SERIES NO. 37
"THE SOUTHERN CROSS" ­ PART TWO
The Southern Cross fluttered over the stockade on the 1st and 2nd of
December 1854.  Although over 1500 miners drilled around the site, most
drifted back to their tents on Saturday night as no one dreamed that they
would be attacked on the Lordıs day.  The extensive spy network within the
stockade alerted the colonial authorities that less than 100 men remained at
the stockade.  Lieutenant Ross, the designer and "bridegroom" of the
Southern Cross, slept near the flagpole.  When the first shots rang out, he
moved to the foot of the flagpole, pistol in hand.  He was shot soon after
he arrived at the site.  As he lay dying at the foot of the flagpole,
Constable John King a 24 year old native of Ireland who had joined the
Victorian Police Force after a failed stint as a miner in 1853, scurried up
the flagpole and ripped down the Southern Cross.  Whether he was presented
with the flag or whether he souvenired it, is difficult to say.  Considering
he was a relatively newly sworn in constable, itıs high likely he souvenired
the Southern Cross.  What was left of it remained in the possession of the
King family who lived at Ararat in Victoria until 1895 when it was loaned to
the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery.
While in the possession of the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery, bits of the flag
were cut off and given to visiting dignitaries.  The flag lay forgotten in a
draw in the gallery until after World War Two, when some members of the
Australian Communist Party tracked it down and agitated for it to be
restored and displayed.
What was left of the huge 8 x 12 foot Southern Cross flag was painfully
restored in 1973 by Valda Angri.  Mrs. Angri did not know till 1981 that her
great great grandmother Anastasia Catherine Withers was one of the three
women who sewed the original flag in 1854.  The ownership of the Southern
Cross continues to be the source of heated argument and legal action.  The
establishment of the Eureka Stockade Museum on the site of the battle a few
years ago has highlighted the incongruity of displaying the Southern Cross
at the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery, the site of the government camp in 1854.
The Southern Cross which had been on loan to the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery
since 1895 was donated to the gallery by the King family in 2001 in order to
put to bed the question of ownership of the flag and where it should be
displayed.  The Ballarat Fine Art Gallery now claims ownership and expects
the King family and the gallery to be acknowledged every time a replica of
the original flag is displayed.
The Southern Cross belongs to all those people who in Raffaelo Carboniıs
words "salute the Southern Cross as the refuge of all the oppressed from all
countries on earth".  The flag belongs to all of us, we do not want to
acknowledge the galleryıs ownership and will have a replica of the original
Southern Cross flag on a 6 meter by 1.5 meter banner which will be launched
outside Parliament House in Melbourne at the end of October.  This banner
will form a central feature of the celebrations at the Eureka Stockade site
on Tuesday the 3rd December 2002.
 BOOK REVIEW
 "doing DEMOCRACY"
 ?The MAP Model for Organising Social Movementsı ­ Bill MOYER with Jo Ann
McAllister, Mary Lou Finley & Steven Soifer.  ISBN 00865714185, New Society
Publishers, www.newsociety.com
Although ?doing Democracyı has some important points to make about the role
social activists play in movements that create egalitarian social change,
Bill Moyer's ideas which have evolved from his association with the Quakers
are limited by his view that "social movements therefore need to be totally
non-violent".  The bookıs main contribution to activism lays in its ability
to dissect the anatomy of social movements and how, many of them develop.
The book is essentially a manual on how to achieve reform not revolutionary
change.  The MAP theory of social activism which is prompted by the author,
is more a set of observations than a theory.  The points that he makes may
be new to people who have recently become involved in protest activity but
they are well known to most social activists.
The authorıs ability to place on paper the experiences of a keen observer
who has been involved in a number of social movements over the past four
decades, is one of its main strengths.  ?doing Democracyı is divided into
four parts: ?The Movement Action Plan (MAP)ı, ?Social Movements Theories and
MAPı, ?Case Studiesı and a conclusion ?Towards The Futureı.  As the authorıs
experiences are mainly limited to the United States, the case studies, The
U.S Civil Rights Movement, The Anti Nuclear Energy Movement, The Gay and
Lesbian Movement in the United States, The Breast Cancer Social Movement and
the Globalisation Movement are heavily weighted in favour of the United
States experience.
?doing Democracyı essentially a ?How To Bookı, has little to add to the
debate about radical social change.  The book is more of an introduction for
people who have recently become social activists than a model for organising
social movements.
?doing Democracyı by Bill Moyer is available from Anarres Books for $22.95
(Australian).  Email your order to mailorder@anarres.org.au.  Not computer
literate, write to them at P.O. BOX 150, EAST BRUNSWICK 3057, MELBOURNE
AUSTRALIA.  Ask them to send you their latest catalogue or look up their
website www.anarres.org.au.  Thanks to ANARRES BOOKS for providing the
review copy of ?doing Democracyı by Bill Moyer.

PERSONAL OBSERVATION
Although they seem tough, strong, impregnable, cities are fragile
structures.  The urbanisation of the planet has crated its own particular
problems.  Rapidly increasing populations and longer life expectancies have
seen more and more people move into rapidly expanding urban centres which in
some cases act as homes to 20 or 30 million people.  A city is a centralised
structured organism which when everything is working in the way it was
designed to, is a pleasure to live in.
Cities are a lot more transient than we would like to think.  Living in a
city is analogous to a traffic accident occurring on a busy road.  Within a
few minutes, what was a smooth ride to town becomes a nightmare.  One
collision can bring a significant part of the city to a halt.  One minute
everything is going fine then bang, everythingıs a mess.  A few sobering
thoughts about city life, which if you think too deeply about them may see
you taking the next train to the country.
A city normally only has enough food to feed the people in it for 2 days.
Damage to one power plant could shut down a city.  Think about the
consequences of a power failure that lasts for days possibly weeks.
Contamination of a cityıs water supply could make hundreds of thousands of
people ill simultaneously.  A virus could infect millions of people in a
city within a few days.  One nuclear bomb could kill millions of people.
Urban dwellers are vulnerable to the weapons of mass destruction as well as
more mundane threats.  It requires a significant amount of co-operative
behaviour for a city to work.  Without goodwill, cities grind to a halt.  It
doesnıt matter how many police or security guards you have, unless people
work co-operatively, city living becomes hell.  Cities are fragile,
vulnerable entities that will only continue to function as open communities
if the ever widening economic and social gaps that the age of economic
irrationalism has created, is initially halted and eventually reversed.

STOP PRESS
 THE TRUTH, THE WHOLE TRUTH AND NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH
As the United States cranks up its military machine to invade Iraq, the
price of oil has begun to escalate.  The consequences of this price rise
will be felt by everyone.  Western society needs oil to function.  Without
oil it would grind to a halt.  The war against Iraq is first and foremost a
war for control of this precious commodity.  It is important we remember
Iraq sits on the second largest oil supply n the world.
As the United States proxy in the Middle East, Israel is consumed with its
own problems fighting the Palestinians, the United States needs to secure
its oil supplies.  Its traditional source Saudi Arabia, is no longer a
secure supply.  As the Saudi Royal Familyıs grip on power is challenged by
Muslim fundamentalists, the United States is no longer able to rely on
unfettered access to Saudi oil.  Itıs important to note that as the
finishing touches are placed on its invasion plans, the United States
administration has clearly stated that Iraq will be administered by the
United States in the same way that Japan was administered after the end of
WWII.
It is so confident of being able to impose military rule in Iraq that it is
no longer bothering to hide behind the rhetoric that it will invade Iraq to
restore democratic and human rights.  The bottom line is very simple, the
United States needs a secure oil supply to keep its economic system ticking
over.  Without oil, its military industrial complex would not be able to
continue to protect the countryıs vast overseas economic interests.
The Howard governmentıs fatal attraction to the Bush administration has
placed us in the front line in the struggle that the United States
government is waging to keep nearly 30% of the worlds oil supply flooding
in, to maintain its military industrial complex.  At the centre of the
dramatic loss of life that the United States and Australiaıs "war on terror"
has caused and continues to cause is just one thing, access to oil.

Joseph TOSCANO/LibertarianWorkers for a Self-Managed Society.

                   
ANARCHIST PUBS REC THIS WEEK
FREEDOM Vol.63 No.19, 5th October 2002, Anarchist Fortnightly, 84b
Whitechapel High St, London E17QX, ENGLAND Email:FreedomCopy@aol.com
UMANITA NOVA Vol 82 No.30 Enrol 22nd Sept.ı02, Settimanale Anarchico, C.50
Palermo 46, 10152, Torino ITALY.  Email fat@inrete.it tel/fax (011) 857850
Mobile 338-6594361 email:fat@inrete.it
OTHER PUBS RECEIVED THIS WEEK
STRIKE UP A CONVERSATION DAY, 10th October 2002, 
strikeupaconvo@hotmail.com

DEBT ELIMINATION APPEAL ­ Our debt stands at $1620.00
See this weekıs ?ACTION BOXı.  Make out cheques or money orders to
LIBERTARIAN WORKERS and send them to P.O. BOX 20, PARKVILLE 3052, 
MELBOURNE,
AUSTRALIA.  If sending $20.00 or less save on money order and banking fees
and send us 45cent stamps.
Debt 17-10-2002            $1620.00
 
RECLAIM THE RADICAL SPIRIT OF THE EUREKA REBELLION
JOIN US ON
TUESDAY THE 3RD OF DECEMBER AT 4.00AM (YES 4.00AM)
THE EUREKA STOCKADE SITE, Corner STAWELL & EUREKA STREET, SOUTH 
BALLARAT  ~
BRING A TORCH!!
Breakfast at Eureka Hall at 8.00AM on the Eureka Stockade site, bring your
food and drinks
March to BAKERY HILL AND BACK TO THE EUREKA STOCKADE SITE AT 
11.00AM  (Round
trip around 5 kilometres)  Lunch at EUREKA HALL AT 1.00PM  Bring your own
food and drinks
AFTER LUNCH CONSERVATION (TALKS) MUSIC
DAY CLOSES 4.00PM
IF YOU CANıT MAKE IT TO BALLARAT ON THE DAY, TAKE THE DAY OFF AND 
ORGANISE
YOUR OWN CELEBRATIONS AND RECLAIM THE RADICAL SPIRIT OF THE 
EUREKA
REBELLION!!

A DOLLAR A DAY
Increasing financial problems have forced us to review how The Anarchist
Media Instituteıs finances are raised.  Currently subscriptions and
donations only account for about 40% of the income necessary to cover our
costs.  To overcome this problem weıve launched a:-
SAVE THE ANARCHIST MEDIA INSTITUTE ~ "A DOLLAR A DAY" CAMPAIGN
We are looking for THIRTY People, interested in our activities, to pledge to
donate 
?A Dollar A Dayı for twelve months.
You can donate monthly or yearly.  Make out cheques and money orders to:-
Libertarian Workers and send to PO Box 20, Parkville. 3052. Melbourne.
Australia.
Those who pledge will receive a "I Saved The Anarchist Media Institute" A3
poster which you can frame and put up at work or home - A great talking
point if nothing else.  Weıve got the ideas and energy but we need your
financial assistance to keep going.  Go on, become one of the Magnificent
Thirty that saved the Anarchist Media Institute.
FIVE READERS HAVE JOINED THE "DOLLAR A DAY" CLUB ­ 25 TO GO JOIN 
TODAY!!
EMPTY YOUR POCKETS OF LOOSE CHANGE AND SAVE THE ANARCHIST 
MEDIA INSTITUTE

ANARCHIST MEDIA INSTITUTE OBSCENITY OF THE WEEK
Has been awarded to our beloved Prime Minister John Howard for his double
somersault with pike performance, as he struggles to win popular support for
a unilateral invasion of Iraq.

STAMP APPEAL  - We normally spend over $400.00 per month on postage stamps.
If you have any spare stamps floating about or are about to write to us,
stuff a few stamps in the envelope.  Every little bit helps.







ALL THE NEWS THAT FITS
This week's stories: Police Violence At S11, Despite Media Hype...Andrew
Bolt Sets New Record...Told You...Workplace Relations Break Down...John
Cleese, Eric Idle to Head Productivity Commission...Democracy Not On the
Agenda For Iraq...Quote of the Week...
Three police officers will face severe reprimands for "improper baton use"
at the S11 protest at Crown Casino in 2000.  A police source told the Herald
Sun that police were "asked to do the dirty work at S11, but after the event
they've been let down".  In contrast, only one of the protestors who was
arrested had a conviction recorded - and he couldn't attend his trial as he
lived interstate.  Before, during, and after the event, TV stations and
newspapers all presented the event as if protestors were planning to commit
violence on innocent police.  So far none have retracted their stories or
apologised.
(Herald Sun Oct 6).
Herald Sun columnist Andrew Bolt has written a column saying that women are
more irrational than men.  One of his reasons was that women tend to be more
suspicious of nuclear power and genetically modified crops.
(Herald Sun Oct 7).
A man whose refugee application was rejected, has been murdered by death
squads in his home country.  Alverto Morales was murdered on his return to
Colombia.
(MX, Oct 10).
Staff at the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations have taken
industrial action over a stalled agreement, and victimisation of a union
delegate.  Ninety percent of staff in the Department voted against the
government's offer on pay and conditions - the largest 'no' vote in public
sector history.  The Department is also said to have punished a union
delegate by not renewing her contract.  Most of Kartika Frank's colleages
had their contracts renewed.  She has been given no explanation, and her
work performance or committment had never been questioned by management in
the time she was working there.
(CPSU press release, Oct 14).
The Productivity Commission believes that doctors are being forced to fill
out too much government paperwork.  They have launched a survey of doctors
to determine the costs of this.  The Commission says that it "recognises
that this may add to GP's paperwork burden".  They are investigating ways to
reduce this burden, and may run a survey on it.
(The Age, Oct 13).
The American government is developing a detailed plan for occupying Iraq.
The plan will not involve elections, until after a period which could take
months or years.  President Bush's aides said they wanted full control of
the country.  If the plan was put into practice the US would control Iraq's
oil reserves, the second largest in the world.
(The Age, Oct 12).
quote of the week:  "I came out here in 1939 as a refugee from Nazi Germany,
and I never thought I'd be queuing up outside a concentration camp all these
years afterwards." 
Walter Bass, who regularly visits refugees detained in Villawood detention
centre.
anarchist news service, write to James, PO Box 503, Newtown NSW 2042 or
email james.hutchings@ato.gov.au contact us to get ATNTF emailed directly to
you.  If you like All the News That Fits, forward it on.
 All the News That Fits appears in the Anarchist Age Weekly Review
(www.vicnet.net.au/~anarchist - PO Box 20 Parkville VIC 3052) and The Ham
(theham@cat.org.au).
Some other Australian anarchist websites:
www.angry.at/racists - Anarchist/anti-racist music site with free mp3s, Real
Audio, Real Video, band interviews etc.
www.dolearmy.org - information for unemployed people.
www.activate.8m.com - anarchist magazine aimed at teenagers.

 If You Like What You Have Read, Photocopy This Publication and Leave It In
Doctors, Dentists, 
Vets Waiting Rooms and In Railway Stations, Bus Stops, Libraries and
Restaurants Etc.

The articles in the Anarchist Age Weekly Review reflect the personal
opinions of the authors, they do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the
publishers, the Libertarian Workers for a Self-Managed Society/Anarchist
Media Institute. 

All material in the Anarchist Age Weekly Review can be used by anarchists,
anarchist collectives and non-profit organisations as long as the source of
the material is mentioned in the article.  The Anarchist Age Weekly Review
reserves all rights as far as commercial publications are concerned.
                   
ANARCHISM ­ ADVANCING IN DIVERSITY STRIKING IN UNISON ­ YAMAGUCHI 
KENJI
WELCOME TO THE 21ST CENTURY ­ THE ANARCHIST CENTURY


*******
                       ********
       ****** The A-Infos News Service ******
      News about and of interest to anarchists
                       ******
  COMMANDS: lists@ainfos.ca
  REPLIES: a-infos-d@ainfos.ca
  HELP: a-infos-org@ainfos.ca
  WWW: http://www.ainfos.ca/
  INFO: http://www.ainfos.ca/org

-To receive a-infos in one language only mail lists@ainfos.ca the message:
                unsubscribe a-infos
                subscribe a-infos-X
 where X = en, ca, de, fr, etc. (i.e. the language code)


A-Infos Information Center